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发表时间:2018-11-27内容来源:VOA英语学习网

To visit the island of Sakhalin is to be reminded of the shifting fortunes of empire.

From Imperial Japan to Tsarist Russia, and later Soviet rule, Wars and changing boundaries have shaped Sakhalin’s history carrying families in their wake.

I was born here, grew up here. Until I was seven, I was brought up in a Japanese family.

Sirokhata’s parents stayed in Sakhalin after Soviet forces took control of the island in the waning days of World War two, so young Masaesi adapted learning Russian and later joining the Soviet army to guard against the Japanese.

The Japanese are coming from over there, they’d say during attack drills.

What do you mean coming? Here’s one right next to me. We all joked about it.

Today, locals prefer to tout Sakhalin’s growing economic integration with Asia while the Kremlin has invested heavily in the island. Sakhalin oil, gas, fishing and tourism industries are all banking on outside investment and visitors.

It’s a long way from days when the Soviet territory was closed to outsiders. We were part of the Soviet Union. We were developing the cities and factories. The people came here to live and work. When I was a schoolboy, I was not at all interested if we had some relations with Japan or not. But Sakhalin’s Korean community still vibrant has never forgotten. My family history is tragic, but that tragedy touched not only us, take almost any family here and it’s the same. Brought to Sakhalin as cheap labor by the Japanese, the island’s Korean diaspora was cut off from their homeland as the Iron Curtain descended.

Even today, the process of family reunification and unfulfilled demands for Japanese reparations is an open wound for many. My home is Sakhalin, but my roots are in Korea, and if we forget our roots, we forget who we are.

Differences over whose roots also lie at the heart of a dispute, over the tiny coral islands that have kept Russia and Japan formally at war for over 70 years.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has suggested to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo the two sides work how to deal by years then.

How realistic that goal, say some locals, depends on how willing the Japanese are to bend.

Russia of course is a generous country and ready to forgive the debts, but give away its territory, no one will forgive that.

And with Russia facing another territorial dispute over the annexation of Crimea, the long standoff with Japan may offer a lesson that resolutions to some disputes remain out of reach, somewhere beyond the horizon.

Charles Maynes for VOA News, Sakhalin Island Russia.

参观库页岛就会想起这个帝国命运的沉浮。

无论是日本帝国还是沙皇俄罗斯,还是后来的苏维埃统治,战争和不断变化的疆界随着许多家庭的改变而改变了库页岛的历史。

我在这里出生长大。7岁之前,都是一个日本家庭抚养我。

Sirokhata的父母一直都在库页岛上生活,即便苏联军队在二战即将结束的时候控制了这座岛也是如此。所以年纪还小的Masaesi就学会了俄语,后来又参加了苏联军队以抗击日本。

日本人会从那个方向过来。训练的时候,大家总会这样说。

你这么说,我不懂,因为这里就已经有一个日本人了呢。我们总会这样开玩笑。

如今,当地人更喜欢以库页岛与亚洲日益增强的经济融合为梗,与此同时,俄罗斯政府也大手笔投资该这座岛。库页岛的石油、天然气和旅游业都靠外部投资和游客来实现。

苏联疆土闭门不开的情况已经是很远的过去了。我们曾是苏联的一部分,我们曾发展城市和工厂,大家曾来这里生活工作。我还是孩子的时候,我根本不在意我们与日本是否交好。但库页岛的韩国社区仍然活跃,他们从未忘记。我的家族历史是一场悲剧,但这场悲剧不只触动了我们、我们的家人们,这场悲剧是所有人的悲剧。我们都是被日本人以廉价劳动力的身份带到这个岛上的,这座岛的朝鲜族侨民被赶出了故土,因为冷战拉开了帷幕。

即便是今天,家人重聚的过程和日本人尚未履行的赔偿是很多人众所周知的伤痛。我的家就在这座岛上,但我的根在韩国。如果我们忘了根,也就忘了自己是谁。

大家对根落于何处有不同的看法,这是争议的核心问题;大家对一些小小珊瑚岛花落谁家也有不同的看法。这样的争议让俄罗斯和日本进行了官方长达70多年的战争。

俄罗斯总统弗拉基米尔·普京已向日本跟首相表示,双方应该通力合作来找到解决问题的合理方式。

这个目标能落地到何处取决于日本人愿意折中到什么程度。

俄罗斯当然是一个慷慨的国家,一个愿意原谅曾经负债的国家,但割让领土是不可原谅的。

现在,俄罗斯面临着另一桩有关克里米亚的领土争端,而俄日之间的长期僵局可能会给俄罗斯上一课——争端的解决方案还是没有力度,连边儿都搭不上。

感谢收听查尔斯从俄罗斯库页岛发回的报道。

来自:VOA英语网 文章地址: https://www.veryv.net/18/11/Normal27080035dq.html